Nabors’ CEO Tony Petrello Amends Its Corporate Governance And Executive Compensation

When Tony Petrello, CEO and President of Nabors Industries replaced former CEO Eugene Isenberg, in 2011, their share price increased by 180 percent.

Marketwatch reported on May 27th, 2014 that Mr. Petrello earned $68.2 million, in 2013, a 246 percent hike compared to 2012. He made number one on Equilar’s 2013 list of U.S. 50 top paid CEOs. It caused an uproar among many of the company’s shareholders who didn’t support its board’s executive compensation plan from 2011 to 2012. Tony Petrello became a member of the Board of Directors in 1991 and contributed to the company expanding to offshore, in 2002.

Nabors moved to Hamilton, Bermuda with the goal of reducing its federal tax liabilities in the United States. Some of the investors were disgruntled about the move and tried to intervene by filing a lawsuit against Nabors Industries, in Houston, Texas. A federal judge presiding over the case ruled in favor of Nabors granting expansion to Bermuda. To satisfy their shareholders, Tony Petrello and the company amended its corporate governance and compensation practices, in April 2014. One of the most significant changes to their practice of compensation is the executive severance payments limitation to three times an executive’s salary and bonus.

Tony Petrello is an experienced lawyer, executive leader, and philanthropist with years of expertise in corporate law, corporate planning, and operations. He holds a law degree from Harvard Law School and completed his undergraduate studies at Yale University. Since 1991, he has climbed the corporate hierarchy, presently serving as CEO, President, and Chairman of Nabors’ Board and Executive Committee. Mr. Petrello, along with his wife Cynthia Petrello are humanitarians and devote their time and money to Texas Children’s Hospital and the Dan and Jan Duncan Neurological Research Institute.

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Get Your Hair Right With Wen

Emily McClure is a writer for The Bustle, and she decided that she wanted to do an experiment with Wen conditioning cleanser. WEN conditioning cleanser has been marketed for the last decade. Many women from all around the world have tried WEN products, and they claim that they are products that are good for all hair types. WEN is a product that was created by a Chaz Dean. Dean was working in the hair care industry for many years. He wanted to do something different for a hair care product. Dean wanted a product that was going to nourish hair without having to strip hair of its natural oils. Wen was created to be as natural as possible. It is a cleanser, a conditioner and a styler all in one.

Chaz Dean (http://chazdean.com/) is a person who truly revolutionized the hair care industry. He started off his career in the photography sector, but his love for hair and cosmetology moved him to want to get into a different profession. Dean loved working with hair, and he was soon working in one of the most prestigious hair salons in the Las Angeles area. Dean created WEN because he wanted to offer his clients a superior hair care product, and that is what he did.

Emily McClure is a woman who has very fine hair, and she wanted to see if WEN would be beneficial for her hair. McClure decided to do the test on her hair for seven days, because she wanted to see how her hair would fair over a week using WEN. McClure found that she liked the way that WEN made her her feel. At times she would feel like her hair was overly greasy if she did not wash it each day. McClure got compliments on her Facebook photo on the way her hair looked with Wen products, and she believes that she would recommend the product to women who have the same type of hair as her.

To order Wen products visit the wen.com website or visit the beauty care aisle of select retailers for more purchase options.

 

Securus Technologies Take on GTL for a Tech Stand-off Challenge

Securus Technologies is a civil and criminal justice technology provider for public safety, corrections monitoring, and investigations. It announced this year that it was offering a challenge to its chief competitor, GTL, to employ an independent technology judge to establish who has the overall best product, the most current high tech refined calling, a high-end efficient platform, and the best customer service and associated data.

 

CEO Richard’s Innovation Response

 

GTL has twisted facts that try to portray that its technology and customer service are comparable to ours, noted Richard Smith, Securus’ CEO. Smith insisted on an independent judge to perform an evaluation of both companies’ products, telephone technologies, and customer service models.

 

Smith noted with concern that a GTL comparison to our company’s technology isn’t fair because we have heavily invested in the procurement of sophisticated technologies ($700 million) in the last four years, to boost our innovative business. We have also been acquiring companies, technology centers, and product development along with a state of the art Customer Service Center, and GTL cannot match our tremendous assets. I wish they could stop this comparison business. We are in a big league, far from where they are today.

 

Our tests indicate that Securus has a call response performance of 600% improved technology than GTL’s. We also use our trained field professionals, unlike GTL who contract most of their work to external individuals who may not have a deep desire to serve customers efficiently like we do at Securus. Our latest VOIP Prison calling system is rated the best in the world. The VOIP Platform provides customers with regular software upgrades that enable services to be flawlessly distributed at a lower cost and much faster when compared to GTL’s locally based older systems.

 

We have facility customers that have reviewed our products over those at GTL’s, and they have concluded that Securus’ technology and customer service is far more superior to that offered by GTL. We have customers that have converted to Securus – because they prefer our technology and customer service. I also see the same win/loss ratios that we retain; we take $4.00 in profits from GTL against $1.00 lost to GTL in the last five years. So can GTL take the technology challenge heat?